2 December 2005 – Too Far Ahead

From Dave Pollard’s blog How To Save the World, actually an old entry as I only dip in now and again, a challenging thought:

Acknowledge with a wry smile that our numbers, those of us who see Too
Far Ahead, are growing. We are heading for a wall, and it is far too
late to brake, but the worst part of the hideous messy crash is still a
half-century or more away. So accepting that, here, now, why is it so difficult for us to simultaneously be these four things:

  1. Accepting: Recognizing
    that our new and well-intentioned but ill-conceived 30,000-year-old
    ‘civilization’ culture is on its last legs and will soon collapse in a
    particularly unpleasant manner, no matter what we do (and it’s no one’s fault);
  2. Responsible (without laying guilt or blame): Doing our best nonetheless to reduce suffering, and to make the world a better place, each in our own way, while we’re here;
  3. Joyful (alive, in the moment): Becoming fully aware, and relishing every day of our lives to the utmost for the astonishing and miraculous experience it is; and
  4. Purposeful (towards a full, natural life): Striving to become each day less what our bland culture tries to make us and more truly ourselves, animal creatures full of wonder, open, connected to and part of all life on our planet.

This is, admittedly, not easy. We are brought up to believe that we, the human master race, are in control,
of the world and of ourselves. It’s hard to accept that we are what we
are, and that we cannot be otherwise no matter how our religions and
philosophies will us to be. It’s even harder to accept responsibility
for our own actions (and inactions) knowing that the brief experiment
of human life on Earth is nearing an end, and that that  is not
our responsibility. And then, with that burden of responsibility and
the news of our species’ looming end, it becomes harder still to be
happy, here, now, in the moment. And then to put an onus on us to
strive for a fuller life, to become what our species has, in the last
30,000 years, forgotten to be, seems an almost unbearable demand of us.